TRAVEL IMMUNIZATIONS

Vaccines recommended for your Destination


Here you can find out which vaccinations are requiring or recommended for the areas you'll be visiting.

Comparing the COVID Vaccines: How Are They Different?

on 06 May 2022

As the COVID-19 pandemic enters its third year, COVID-19 vaccines have proven to be safe, effective and life-saving.

The Omicron variant and its subvariant BA.2 have been driving an increase in cases worldwide primarily among people who are unvaccinated, and it is even causing infections in some vaccinated people. The good news is that COVID-19 vaccines are still expected to be effective at preventing severe disease, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19.

We mapped out a comparison of the most common COVID vaccines.

Vaccines:

Pfizer Moderna AstraZeneca Johnson & Johnson Novavax

Effectiveness

91% effective at preventing the disease in people age 16 and older.

100% effective at preventing the COVID-19 virus in children ages 12 through 15.

91% effective in preventing the COVID-19 in children ages 5 through 11.

94% effective at preventing the COVID-19 virus with symptoms.

Greater than 90% effective in preventing people with health conditions, such as diabetes or obesity, from developing the COVID-19 virus with symptoms.

70% 

66% effective at preventing the COVID-19 virus with symptoms

85% effective at preventing the COVID-19 virus with severe illness

89.7%

Age

People 5 years and older

People 18 years and older

People aged 18 years and older

People 18 years and older

People 18 years and older

How many shots do you need?

Two doses, 3 weeks apart

Two doses, 4 weeks apart

Two doses, a month apart

One dose

Two doses, 21 days apart

Booster shot

At least 5 months after your primary COVID-19 vaccination series (for people 16 years and older). Teens between 12 and 17 may only get the Pfizer booster shot.

At least 5 months after your primary COVID-19 vaccination (for people 18 years and older)

At least 6 months after your primary COVID-19 vaccination (for people 18 years and older)

At least 2 months after your primary J&J COVID-19 vaccination (for people 18 years and older)   Limited approval as booster in Australia

Side effects

Fatigue, headache, chills, muscle pain, especially after the second dose

Fever, muscle aches, headaches lasting a few days. Effects worse after second dose. 

Pain where you get the shot, fever, muscle aches, headache

Pain where you get the shot, headache, fatigue, muscle pain

Pain and tenderness where you get the shot, fatigue, headache, muscle pain

Pregnant women and nursing moms

Safe and recommended for pregnant 

Safe and recommended for pregnant 

Discuss your options with your health care provider. 

Discuss your options with your health care provider. 

Not yet available

Is there anyone who shouldn’t get the vaccine?

People with a history of serious allergic reactions, anyone with a history of allergic reactions to vaccine ingredients, including polyethylene glycol, and anyone with a history of allergic reactions to polysorbate

People with a history of serious allergic reactions, anyone with a history of allergic reactions to vaccine ingredients, including polyethylene glycol, and anyone with a history of allergic reactions to polysorbate

Anyone who’s had an allergic reaction to an ingredient in the vaccine.

Anyone who’s had an allergic reaction to an ingredient in the vaccine, like polysorbate 

Not yet available

Any significant side effects? 

Extremely rare cases of anaphylaxis in people who received the vaccine.

Extremely rare cases of Bell's palsy, a type of temporary facial paralysis, reported in people who received the vaccine.

Extremely rare cases of anaphylaxis in people who received the vaccine.

Extremely rare cases of Bell's palsy, a type of temporary facial paralysis, reported in people who received the vaccine.

Four total serious side effects, including two cases of transverse myelitis

There is a possible, rare relationship between this vaccine and blood clots with low platelets.

Not yet available

What about people with lowered immune function? 

OK for people whose immune function is lowered by HIV or immunosuppressing drugs if they have no other reasons to avoid it. There is limited safety data in this group. Discuss the benefits and risks with your doctor.

OK for people whose immune function is lowered by HIV or immunosuppressing drugs if they have no other reasons to avoid it. There is limited safety data in this group. Discuss the benefits and risks with your doctor.

Not yet available

Not yet available

Not yet available

Credit: cdc.gov, webmd.com, and hopkinsmedicine.org
Last Updated: 10 May 2022
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